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Wednesday, October 7, 2020

Check It Out: The Puffin Plan

 



FREE
 
Appropriate for ages 10+
 
Date: October 7, 2020
 
Time: 5:00 pm to 5:45 pm ET
 


Fifty years ago, a young ornithologist named Steve Kress fell in love with puffins. After learning that hunting had nearly eradicated their colonies in the 1880s off small, rocky islands in Maine, he resolved to bring them back. In 1973, he began collecting chicks in Canada, flying them to Maine, raising them in coffee-can nests, transporting them to their new island home, watching over them as they grew, and then waiting—for years—to see if they would come back. From 2 birds left in the entire state in 1902, there are now more than 1,300 pairs of puffins on Maine islands. In this session you will learn how Kress’s quest, today called Project Puffin, became one of the world’s biggest conservation victories.
 
Co-author Derrick Z. Jackson has documented the success of Project Puffin with close and personal puffin photos, which he will share in this special event. As a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, as well as numerous other awards for both his writing and photography, Derrick has an impressive array of photographic experience to share.
 
Steve and Derrick will frame this session around their new book, The Puffin Plan - Restoring Seabirds to Egg Rock and Beyond. Come prepared to fall even more in love with these endearing creatures, be awed by how they thrive in their natural habitat, and learn how the Puffin Project reclaimed a piece of our rich biological heritage.  Maybe you will be inspired, like others around the world, to help animals return to their native habitats.

Find out more about the book below!




The Puffin Plan by Stephen W. Kress & Derrick Z. Jackson
Middle Grade Science & Nature

Fifty years ago, a young ornithologist named Steve Kress fell in love with puffins. After learning that hunting had eradicated their colonies on small, rocky islands off the coast of Maine, he resolved to bring them back. So began a decades-long quest that involved collecting chicks in Canada, flying them to Maine, raising them in coffee-can nests, transporting them to their new island home, watching over them as they grew, and then waiting—for years—to see if they would come back. This is the story of how the Puffin Project reclaimed a piece of our rich biological heritage, and how it inspired other groups around the world to help other species re-root in their native lands.

Where to buy: Tumblehome

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